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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
letter to secretary clinton and left washington. she resumed her princeton professorship and life in new jersey with her husband and two teenage sons. in the wake of her departure, slaughter wrote a cover story for "the atlantic magazine" why women still can't have it all. within days, the piece became the most read in t"the atlantic's" history. tonight, she takes us behind that personal decision that became a raging public debate. explain the intensity of that kind of job, because it's really much more than what many people think. thisst is a more intense job th senior jobs in the private sector. >> it's certainly comparable. it's an assistant secretary job, which means you're on pretty much all the time. you're the head of the secretary of state's private think tank. that means you cover the entire world, just as she does. and you're on for everything she needs you to do. and every sort of -- the longer-term planning and you work pretty much round the clock. >> so you're working probably six days a week? >> absolutely. now, i commuted back every weekend because i had to be with my kids
senator told a group of republicans this weekend that he does not want washington to dictate how he votes and that his commitment is to his constituents. he's one of 39 senators who signed conservative activist norquist pledge but the looming fiscal cliff has caused several lawmakers to walk back from that promise. reliable sources is at the top of the hour. >>> the democratic republic of the congo is a nation the size of all of western europe. it may be in for a violent regime change as rebels have gained ground in recent weeks. congo was the setting for the heart of darkness and that hasn't lifted in 110 years since the story was public . 5.4 million people have died. jeff, why is it that the crisis seems to be heating up? you point out that the congo that the government's army is losing battle after battle. >> i think this is really an issue of state failure. i've been covering congo for six years and i've seen the country get weaker and weaker since i began. there was a big election in 2006 that created a lot of hope and enthusiasm that things were turning around. they haven't. the go
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)